Focus@will - a new music service based on human neuroscience

Should you listen to music while working?

Well, it's an individual preference. While it is scientifically proven that listening to music enhances your ability to focus and concentrate, some individuals work better in complete silence.

While this blog does not get into the nitty-gritty of how music influences the functioning of the brain (you can read about it in an earlier blog called 'Should you listen to music while working?'), the purpose is to throw light on the fact that, in addition to all the music around us and with our personal preferences of music, audio technology has emerged with scientifically created music to enhance your ability to focus, concentrate and boost your productivity at work.

Let's take a look at one website that offers this music service - focusatwill.com

For those who listen to music while working, this website could be an interesting place to explore scientifically designed music.

If you feel that you are running out of playlists or probably, looking for scientifically curated music to boost your focus at work, focus@will.com could be an option to consider. You can try it out. They offer only a week's free trial.

What do they have online?

1. The site provides different music channels that contain customised instrumental music. They also have a channel dedicated to ADHD.

2. You can take their 1 min science quiz to find out which genre of music will help you optimize your focus and concentration, and boost productivity.

3. You can simply rollover the music samples to hear them.

4. Trackers to measure your focus and productivity during sessions while listening to the customised music.

What the site says?

"Our exclusive instrumental music library includes a significant number of newly commissioned works from well-known music producers and composers that you won’t hear anywhere else."

"We ask our users to rate their productivity during each session, and we’ve found that the average productivity in a one-hour focus@will session is 75% – this is far above the productivity most people report in an hour without focus@will."

Their site has a link to a white research paper that explains how it works: https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.04255 ('The Influence of Streamlined Music on Cognition and Mood' by Science Director Dr Julia Mossbridge)
The site also says, "The initial study on Focus@Will Research showing an increase of 11-12% for beta and theta frequencies at the P3 and P4 regions, situated over brain area 39, which bilaterally serves functions such as processing language, reading, spatial focusing and executive control' (A bit too much of neuroscience reading and understanding to guage their success rates...)
To conclude, there is 1 more avenue to get the music that you want that will help you to stay focussed on your work and boost creativity and productivity.